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guru



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MessagePosté le: 03/03/2008 09:53:34    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

ça me démangeait alors voilà.

On dit à enregistrer pendant les vacances d'avril, au moins une première partie.

On a (pour l'instant, mais il ne s'agit pas de tout prendre):

Slint
Talk Talk
Stereolab
Laika/Moonshake
Bark Psychosis
Pram
Tortoise / Gastr Del Sol/ The sea and cake
Godspeed/ A Silver M Z/ Do Make Say Think/ Fly Pan Am
Mogwaï
Explosions in the sky/ Pelican/ Mono
HREDA/ 65 daysofstatic/ Youthmovies/ Eye of Daw

ou
Labradford
Trans Am
Ui
Flying Saucer Attack
Dirty 3
...

Qui s'inscrit ?

On est d'accord, c'est pas une liste exhaustive. Peut-être qu'il y a des gens qui n'ont rien à faire là. Faut creuser, trier, écouter, faire écouter, discuter.
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Publicité






MessagePosté le: 03/03/2008 09:53:34    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
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MessagePosté le: 03/03/2008 15:24:09    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Moi, moi, monsieur, et je prendrais bien :

Godspeed/ A Silver M Z/ Do Make Say Think/ Fly Pan Am
Mogwaï
parce que j'ai déjà.

Tortoise / Gastr Del Sol/ The sea and cake
Parce que j'ai envie de mieux connaitre.
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MessagePosté le: 03/03/2008 19:00:31    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Je savais que je pouvais compter sur toi.

Alors j'ai réfléchi (j'ai le temps avec mon boulot). Voilà, on fait juste dans un premier temps:
-Slint, Talk Talk et disons Bark Psychosis (ce dernier si c'est possible). C'est l'épisode 1. En avril.

Ensuite ça pourrait être:
-Tortoise, Godspeed, Mogwai. Episode 2. Quand on a le temps.

Et en épisode 3, les gens plutôt de ces dernières années.

Ca n'empêche pas d'évoquer les autres canadiens quand on parle de Godspeed, ou the sea and cake quand c'est Tortoise.

?
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MessagePosté le: 04/03/2008 18:24:26    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

T'afait. Quand je mettais Godspeed/DMST/Fly Pan am/Silver Mt Zion, je pensais bien faire un lot.

Pour le premier épisode, on se répartit comment ?
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MessagePosté le: 04/03/2008 18:50:23    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Comme tu veux.

Est-ce que The Hostess veut parler de Talk Talk ?
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MessagePosté le: 04/03/2008 19:30:06    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Si oui je veux bien prendre Slint et te laisser le truc que je connais pas mais qui a l'air prometteur.
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MessagePosté le: 05/03/2008 06:19:46    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Hostess ?
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MessagePosté le: 14/03/2008 17:08:42    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Alors Bark Psychosis c'est vraiment, vraiment très bien; Je vous en cause et je vous en passe.
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MessagePosté le: 24/03/2008 16:01:22    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

J'ai lu plusieurs trucs cet après-midi et ça fait cogiter.

je suis plus maintenant sur:

1) des anglais (Bark P, Stereolab ...) + Tortoise

2) Slint, Constellation, Mogwai

3) du récent
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MessagePosté le: 06/04/2008 12:13:07    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Today's more adventurous rock groups are embracing technology and the avant garde to forge a new genre: post-rock. Simon Reynolds talks to Main, Seefeel and Disco Inferno, and looks to a future where riffs and powerchords will be replaced by virtual zones, machine time and the cyborg interface

shaking the rock narcotic


Like a clapped out stretch limo cranked in reverse, today's 'alternative rock' is synonymous with a retreat to one of a number of period genres from rock history. For Primal Scream think Exile On Main Street-era Stones. For Suede think Ziggy-phase Bowie. In 1994, just six short years from a new millennium, this is where the money is at: in the musical equivalent of reproduction antiques.

Recently, however, a smattering of British groups, energised by developments in electronic studio based musics such as Techno and HipHop, as well as free improvisation and the avant garde, have started venturing into a more financially precarious, but aesthetically vital hinterland-without-a-name. The roll call of futurist honour includes Disco Inferno, Seefeel, Insides, Bark Psychosis, Main, Papa Sprain, Stereolab, Pram and Moonshake, along with such prolific figures as Kevin Martin (Ice/Techno Animal/God/EAR) and ex-Napalm Death drummer Mick Harris (Scorn/Lull).

What to call this zone? Some of its occupants, Seefeel for instance, could be dubbed 'Ambient'; others, Bark Psychosis and Papa Sprain, could be called 'art rock'. 'Avant rock' would just about suffice, but is too suggestive of jerky time signatures and a dearth of melodic loveliness, which isn't necessarily the case. Perhaps the only term open ended yet precise enough to cover all this activity is 'post-rock'.

Post-rock means using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. Increasingly, post-rock groups are augmenting the traditional guitar/bass/drums line up with computer technology: the sampler, the sequencer and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface). While some post-rock units (Pram, Stereolab) prefer lo-fi or outmoded technology, others are evolving into cyber rock, becoming virtual.

*

The best way to get a handle on how these groups depart from the 'rock process' is to work from a rigorous model of how the traditional rock 'n' roll group operates. And there's none more rigorous than Joe Carducci's Rock And The Pop Narcotic (published in 1990 by Redoubt, with a revised edition planned for later this year). Carducci may be a bit of a reactionary, but his theory of rock is grounded in a precise, materialist definition of it as music, rather than 'attitude', 'spirit', 'rebellion', or any other metaphysical notions. Rock's essence, says Carducci, is the real time interaction of drums, bass and rhythm guitar. A group should be a rhythmic engine creating kinetic energy; 'breathing' as an organic entity.

Carducci valorises the strenuous, collective physicality of performance. His ideal rock process is opposed to the Pop Method, which is studio based and elevates the producer over the musicians. Modern music is a sterile, frigid wasteland because the producer/studio ('cold') has triumphed over rock ('hot'). With a typically American prejudice, Carducci favours the 'presence' of live performance over the increasingly 'virtual' nature of studio music, and prefers the 'documentarian' recording techniques that characterised early 70s hard rock, which were revived by Spot, house producer at SST, the seminal 80s hardcore punk label that Carducci co-founded.

If Carducci has a polar opposite in rock theory, it's that archetypal boffin in the sound lab, Brian Eno. In fact, the art rock tradition that Eno stands for an which is crucial to the development of today's post-rock, is something like an egghead version of the Tin Pan Alley pop process that Carducci detests; there's a line running from Phil Spector and Brian Wilson that leads to Eno as clearly as it does to, say, Trevor Horn. Both the Spector and Eno approaches to soundscaping involve using musicians as a sort of palette of textures, as opposed to the rock band's collective toil. Increasingly, the post-Eno approach involves dispensing with musicians altogether in favour of machines.

Another way in which Eno is the prophet of post-rock is his elevation of timbre/texture/chromatics over riffs and rhythm sections; the desire to create a 'fictional psycho-acoustic space' rather than groove and thrust. When he was invited to produce U2 (a group that Carducci reviles as the very model of non-rocking fraudulence) Eno warned Bono: "I'm not interested in records as a document of a rock band playing on stage. I'm more interested in painting pictures. I want to create a landscape within which this music happens." As it turned out, this subordination of the aural to the visual was perfect for Bono's 'visionary' vocals, The Edge's stratospheric guitar and the inert rhythm section.

Throughout Eno's own oeuvre, there's a gradual eradication of kinetic energy, beginning with the early solo LPs (with their limpid, uneventful water colours and lyrical imagery of treading water) and culminating in the entropic, vegetative bliss of Ambient. The difference between the Carducci and Eno aesthetics is the difference between 'manly' manual labour and 'effete' white collar brainwork. Carducci actually calls his tradition (the blues-bastardising lineage that runs from Black Sabbath through Black Flag to Soundgarden) "new redneck". By defending the aesthetic of 'heavy' (heavy rock, heavy industry) against studio-concocted 'lite', Carducci wants to protect traditional artisan skills from being usurped by machines (which, in studios as much as factories, are more reliable and cheaper than humans). By contrast, the Enoites embrace technology that empowers the musically incompetent.

*

Carducci can't make sense of the pop present, which is based in the soundsculpting innovations of dub, in disco's remixology and HipHop's sampladelic sorcery. His version of rock history also downgrades psychedelia, which was the first music to use 24 track recording to conjure fictional headspace. 'Phonography' (a term that author Evan Eisenberg coined, in his book The Recording Angel, to describe the art of recording) bears the same relation to live music as cinema does to theatre. With most rock records, the studio is used to create a simulacrum of live performance, although multi-tracking makes it more vivid and hyper-real than 'live'. But multi-tracking and other studio techniques can also be used to create 'impossible' events, which could never possibly take place in real time. The sampler, transubstantiating sound into digital data, takes this even further - different eras, different auras, can be combined to form a transchronistic pseudo event. You could call this 'magick', you could call it 'deconstruction of the metaphysics of presence' - either way, today's post-rock groups are absconding into this virtual, ethereal realm.

*

Post-rock draws its inspiration and impetus from a complex combination of sources. Some of these come from post-rock's own tradition - a series of moments in history when eggheads and bohemians have hijacked elements of rock for non-rock purposes (think of the guitar based late 60s music of The Velvet Underground and Pink Floyd, and a subsequent lineage that includes New York's No Wave groups, Joy Division, The Cocteau Twins, The Jesus And Mary Chain, My Bloody Valentine and AR Kane; or the so-called 'Krautrock' of Can, Faust, Neu, Cluster and Ash Ra Tempel; as well as the late 70s/early 80s post-punk vanguard of PiL, 23 Skidoo, Cabaret Voltaire and The Pop Group). Other impulses arrive from outside of rock: Eno, obviously, but also the mid-60s drone-minimalism of Terry Riley and LaMonte Young, as well as musique concrete and electroacoustic music, dub reggae and modern sampladelic genres like HipHop and Techno. Most of the British post-rock groups also explicitly define themselves against Grunge, which was Carducci's dream come true: the fusion of punk and Metal into an all-American nouveau hard rock.

*

For the post-rock groups, Sonic Youth's idea of 'reinventing the guitar' really means un-rocking the guitar; sometimes the next step is ditching the guitar altogether. Disco Inferno's Iain Crause says he always wanted to make his guitar sound like "actual physical things", such as waterfalls, but in DI's early days (when the group sounded closer to Joy Division and The Durutti Column) he had to do it with masses of effects. It's been said that DI decided to go digital after seeing those samplin', rockin' Industrial muthas of invention The Young Gods live. But according to Crause, the real Damascus experience was hearing Hank Shocklee's Bomb Squad productions for Public Enemy. Inspired, Crause traded in his rack of pedals for a guitar synth, which he now rigs up to MIDI so that each string triggers a different sample.

The results can be heard on the astounding LP, DI Go Pop. "A Crash At Every Speed" samples Miles Davis's "Bitches Brew" and Industrial Improv unit God; "Starbound" samples U2 and children's laughter; while the gorgeous "Footprints In Snow" samples Saint-Saens's "Aquarium". Not that you can tell, since Crause 'plays' these sample-tones rather than merely quoting them. Because he's using a fretboard rather than the usual keyboard, he can use all the guitarist's traditional devices - bending the strings ("It literally sounds like you're twisting the samples", he says), jamming and improvising. This results in unearthly ninth dimensional noises that bear no discernible link to the physical acts that generated them. (Perhaps even more disorient ating is the group's approach to the drums. They use a MIDI-ed up kit whose pads also cue samples. On "Footprints", for instance, the tom-toms reproduce the sound of footfalls.)

Crause sees Disco Inferno as a "virtual reality band". But what's really inter esting about them is the way they haven't totally abandoned the rock process: they combine the physicality of live performance with the wizardry of sampling. (Crause claims that DI Go Pop was recorded live, and that the group's future plans include using Marshall amps!)

*

Other post-rock groups are more affiliated to Techno. Insides compose on Cubase, a widely used computer music program that functions as a sort of "virtual tape recorder", according to the group's J Serge Tardo. "Cubase allows you to 'play' things you couldn't physically play," he says. Like a sequencer, it 'remembers' a riff, motif or beat and reiterates it in any timbre, whether sampled or derived from a module (a sort of digital library of sounds, no bigger than a Kelloggs Pop Tart).

Insides' non-rock approach dates back to their earlier lo-fi incarnation as Earwig. "[In Earwig] we all played hermetically sealed patterns that overlapped but didn't gel. We'd play separately, in a sense," explains Tardo. Like systems musicians, Insides weave a tapestry of sound-threads, where Tardo's guitar features as just another iridescent filigree. In fact, he says the greatest influence on his guitar playing is Kraftwerk!

Tardo prefers "the godlike position of manipulating the soundscape from the outside [the classic Spector/Eno role] as opposed to being in the mix, like a guitarist." When the group play live, improvisation figures only in the sense that "you can have a husk of sequencer patterns that you can mutate, like in a dub mix" (an approach which has direct parallels with the live performances of such Techno operatives as Orbital and Mixmaster Morris). Performance isn't strenuous in the Carducci sense, but it's mentally draining - "Like doing somersaults in your head," says Tardo.

*

Like Disco Inferno and Insides, Seefeel are one of those groups whose Year Zero coincides with the arrival of Joy Division and The Cocteau Twins, and whose aesthetic is shaped by the late 80s dreampop of My Bloody Valentine and AR Kane. The latter awoke Seefeel's interest in sound-in-itself, which gradually led them to club based musics such as Techno and House. Of all the post-rock units, Seefeel have most avidly embraced Techno's methodology appropriately, they've found a commercial niche in the 'electronic listenin g' genre (recently performing alongside Autechre and u-ziq), and a home on its premier label, Warp.

Seefeel use a lot of guitars, but only as a source of timbre (all cirrus swirls and drone drifts). If it's mostly impossible to distinguish their guitar tex tures from the sequenced/sampled material, again it's because of Cubase, which, says Mark Clifford, allows them to "take two seconds of guitar and chop it into 1000 pieces, loop it, string it out for ten minutes, layer it, and so on." Similarly, Sarah Peacock's voice is not deployed expressively but used as material; the title track of Seefeel's imminent Ch-Vox EP (a one-off for Richard 'Aphex Twin' James's Rephlex label) is composed entirely of her treated and timestretched vocal drone.

Live, the Techno process means that Justin Fletcher drums to a click-track, while the rest of the band must keep in sync with the pre-recorded parts. Not surprisingly, this is unrewarding and they'd prefer to dispense with gigs altogether. Clifford's fantasy alternative would involve Seefeel creating an aural environment but not actually being the focal point on stage, which is closer to the process of club DJing than being in a rock 'n' roll group.

*

A similar fantasy appeals to Robert Hampson of Main, who reckons "these c ould be the last days of gig-going." He imagines organising "a live mix scenario, where we'd be hidden out of sight, behind a desk"; a sort of avant rock sound system, in other words. Unsurprisingly, Main are primarily studio based, a sound laboratory. With Main, Hampson has returned to the experimental music he made before he formed the mid-80s indie group Loop, which was based around tape loops and layers of processed guitars. Main have progressively shed Loop's vestigial rock traces, dispensing first with human drums, then with the drum machine. The percussion on their new LP Motion Pool is all sampled, and even this may eventually be replaced with pure ambience.

Hampson is a longtime foe of the sampler, he says, and resorted to it reluctantly. Sometimes he prefers to physically play Main's most monotonous, uninflected, one chord riffs, because of the minuscule differences in attack and tone this produces. "To sample the chord and sequence it," he says, "would iron out the character, flatten the sound." As Main drift away from the rock process and the rock mainstream, they inevitably move closer to the avant garde, finding allies with contemporary improvisors and droneologists like Jim O'Rourke, Paul Schutze, AMM's Eddie Prevost, Thomas Koner, KK Null and J im Plotkin. A recent North London live showcase for Motion Pool made this connection explicit, with Main's two sets split by a free improvisation featuring O'Rourke, Plotkin and Prevost.

*

Another key player in this area is Kevin Martin. He runs Pathological Records, leads the post-rock outfits God, Techno Animal and Ice, and participates in the 'supergroup' EAR (along with Sonic Boom, Kevin Shields of MBV and Eddie Prevost). From his own experience as a producer and bandleader, Martin reckons that "working with technology, you become fond of machine time and fed up with the fallibility of human time." God is his most traditional project, since it's about combustive improvisation and physical effort, "the sparks and flashpoints that come from human elements. I see God as a relic of another time, which is why we have images of burnt out locomotives on the covers."

God LPs (a new one, The Anatomy Of Addiction, is imminent) straddle jamming spontaneity and studio mixology. By contrast, Ice and Techno Animal were both conceived with no thought of live performance. For those units, Martin was (like Disco Inferno's Iain Crause) heavily influenced by Public Enemy, specifically the way Hank Shocklee's production situates a song's dynamic in the vertical, not the horizontal: "The shifting layers of frequencies, not the development of verse-chorus narrative," says Martin. "Of course, you could say the same about Jeff Mills or Stakker Humanoid. But Shocklee, on Fear Of A Black Planet, was the first to use sampling to pile on the intensities, rather than just quote obvious riffs; he took the peaks of other songs, like trumpet solos, and layered them densely."

Many of his kindred spirits on the avant rock peripheries - Robert Hampson, Mick Harris, Justin Broadrick (Godflesh/Final) - are embracing digital technology, and Martin thinks that's because digital sound appeals to control freaks. "[These musicians] are a bit solipsistic, they like to control all aspects of what they do. Also, as the audience for adventurous music c ontracts, they get less interested in playing live, it doesn't pay, and instead retreat to their home fortresses and surround themselves with machinery. I think that connects to what's going on in society as a whole - a process of atomisation and disconnection. Digital also appeals because it allows you to break down structure."

Despite the 'cold' accuracy of digital sound, Martin sees post-rock retaining some kind of primal energy. It's not physical in the Carducci sense, but "a different kind of friction, the kind that comes with people wanting to interface and integrate themselves with machinery. It's like Lee Perry saying he wanted the mixing desk to take him over, or Can talking about machines having souls. People feel outdated by machinery. So they're taking on technology, but using it to unleash primal energy."

So perhaps the really provocative area for future development lies not in cyber rock but cyborg rock; not the wholehearted embrace of Techno's methodology, but some kind of interface between real time, hands-on playing and the use of digital effects and enhancement. As Kevin Martin points out: "Even in the digital age, you still have a body. It's the connection between 'Techno' and 'Animal' that's interesting."



This article first appeared in issue 123 (May 94).
© 1997 The Wire.
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MessagePosté le: 07/04/2008 09:33:10    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

moi je veux bien faire talk talk avec vous, cool un podcast Post rock ! Cool
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MessagePosté le: 08/04/2008 05:20:12    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Super!

J'ai encore changé le découpage possible. On en cause par mail.
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MessagePosté le: 15/05/2008 14:49:37    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

alors, ça avance ???
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MessagePosté le: 15/05/2008 17:54:58    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

J'attends toujours la réponse de Mr B à mon mail d'il y a 6 mois, mail auquel the Hostess avait gentiment répondu.
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MessagePosté le: 16/05/2008 18:35:14    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

c'est le surbookage Sad

(rien à voir mais the hostess vient de déballer un disque à côté de moi et le packaging est tout bonnement magnifique... elle vous le montrera sûrement... rien que pour l'objet, ça décourage le téléchargement)
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MessagePosté le: 17/05/2008 08:45:16    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

oui, je crois que certains ont compris l'effort à faire dans ce sens.
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MessagePosté le: 17/05/2008 11:51:10    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

guru a écrit:
J'attends toujours la réponse de Mr B à mon mail d'il y a 6 mois, mail auquel the Hostess avait gentiment répondu.


Embarassed Je vais essayer de retrouver ça parce côté surbookage, étant en stage à l'IUFM depuis vendredi, je ne suis plus crédible.
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MessagePosté le: 18/05/2008 10:04:47    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Toujours la même machine à café ?
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MessagePosté le: 18/05/2008 13:18:31    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

et les mêmes Nougatti ? (Pensée à la Belle du Guru Wink )
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MessagePosté le: 26/06/2008 14:39:31    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

enregistrement prévu le 05/07
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MessagePosté le: 02/07/2008 10:11:00    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

The Lost Generation
How UK Post-Rock Fell in Love With the Moon (And a Bunch of Bands Nobody Listened to Defined the 1990s)
Story by Nitsuh Abebe | Digg this article | Add to del.icio.us

This decade's indie-kid rhetoric is all about excitement, all about fun, all about fierce. The season's buzz tour pairs M.I.A. with LCD Soundsystem, scrappy globo-pop with the kind of rock disco that tries awfully hard to blow fuses. The venues they don't hit will play host to a new wave of stylish guitar bands, playing stylish uptempo pop, decamping to stylish afterparties. Bloggers will chatter about glittery chart hits, rock kids will buy vintage metal t-shirts and act like heshers, eggheads will rave about the latest in spazzed-out noise, and everyone will keep talking about dancing, right down to the punks. Yeah, there are more exceptions than there are examples-- when aren't there, dude?-- but the vibe is all there: We keep talking like we want action, like we want something explosive.

The overriding vibe of the 1990s -- serene, cerebral, dreamy-- was anything but explosive. Blame grunge for that one. Just a few years into the decade, and all that muddy rock attitude and fuzzy alterna-sound had bubbled up into the mainstream, flooding the scene with new kids, young kids, even (gasp!) fratboys. Big kids in flannel, freshly enamored of rock's "aggression" and "rebellion"-- they were rock jocks, they tried to start mosh pits at Liz Phair shows. So where was a refined little smarty-pants indie snob to turn?

Well: Why not something spacey and elegant? Why not sit comfortably home, stoned or non-stoned, dropping out into a dreamier little world of sound? It had been a few years since My Bloody Valentine released Loveless, and there were plenty of similarly floaty shoegazer bands to catch up on. There was Intelligent Dance Music-- "intelligent!"-- a whole subgenre of otherworldly electronics, built from the start for tripped-out home listening. (Would the kids at the rock shows appreciate an Aphex Twin album, or go to a show to watch Mouse on Mars bob over a tableful of machines?) There was trip-hop, sleepy and sensual and alien; there were reissues of exotic lounge albums and Moog records, quaint new scenery for your daydreams. Stereolab would conjure playful new worlds of pop drone, Tortoise would turn your house into an instrumental aquarium, Air would chill you out with French horn melodies, and everyone would be moony and polite and use words like "soundscape." Superchunk, a pretty good indie barometer, would start the decade shouting about bad jobs and end it crooning over the obligatory vibraphone; Yo La Tengo, another good yardstick, would do something pretty similar as well.

And this whole project took off so successfully that most people never really noticed the first wave of bands to lay the groundwork-- the "lost generation" of airy, moon-obsessed English acts that got the ball rolling on the dreamy, avant 90s.


***

"They were an indie band that didn't want to be an indie band": That's how Paul Cox, co-founder of the Too Pure label, described Seefeel, one of his acts. That one sentence might be the single best summary of the post-rock project-- a crew of underground guitar bands who suddenly got the idea that they could play much more than rock, and spent the next few years trying to break free into whatever that "much more" might turn out to be.

"Indie bands that didn't want to be indie bands," though-- it's kind of a mouthful of a genre name, and the critic Simon Reynolds quickly stepped in with something more concise. His first use of the term "post-rock" came in a review of a Bark Psychosis record; the one that counted came in a 1994 issue of The Wire. One album does not a genre make, and in that '94 article, Reynolds went about lassoing together the bands that made the scene: Disco Inferno, Seefeel, Stereolab, Pram, Moonshake, and others.

What united these acts? For Reynolds, it was something conceptual, something fundamental in their approach to making "rock" music. Traditional rock, he said-- citing no less a rock dude than Joe Carducci-- was about one central act: Bass, drums, and guitar, coming together in one space to create some hot, organic energy, with the recorded album serving only as an attempt to capture the live "real thing." British indie, as of the late 1980s, may not have been very "rock'n'roll," but it certainly fit that mold; the jangly guitar-pop at its core had made such an act of sounding natural that some bands didn't even seem to be trying very hard. And what was grunge but good old hard rock, reborn in new clothes?

The post-rock bands, many of whom set themselves up as enemies of grunge, wanted to get past that model. In them, Reynolds saw more affinity with people like Brian Eno and Phil Spector-- people who saw the recording studio as a place to create new worlds of sound, imagined arrangements having nothing in particular to do with the "real" world. More importantly, many of these acts had been inspired by the progress of genres well outside of rock: The sample sorcery of hip-hop, the inorganic motion of techno, the remarkable space and texture of dub reggae-- studio music. That enthusiasm bleeds straight through the band profiles in Reynolds' article, sounding kind of adorably of-the-moment. The artists, ready for revolution, talk about things like the death of the rock gig; Reynolds, speculating happily, talks about bands "evolving into cyber-rock, becoming virtual."

The trick, though-- looking back on these records-- is how much they seem defined by the moments when those things failed to happen. The indie-electronic sound of Seefeel, for instance, doesn't particularly signal an era; it feels like one logical point on a line stretching from Eno and techno to latter-day acts like Flowchart and Ulrich Schnauss. No, these bands sound most incomparable when they're most in touch with their rock backgrounds; you can actually hear them thrilling and straining as they break through, and Reynolds, at the close of his article, seems to hint at just that. What sets the lost generation apart isn't the sound of The Bands that Weren't Indie. It's something closer to Cox's formulation: The sound of Some Bands Trying Not to Be Indie-- and stumbling, in the process, into something new, something post-rock.
***

It's the Essex band Disco Inferno that puts the "lost" in lost generation; their records struggled to find homes even when the band was a going concern, and they've since been championed mostly by a small, enthusiastic bunch of critics, collectors, obscurists, and geeks. This despite their music being some of the most excitingly singular stuff of the era-- and offering one of the best models for how the post-rock impulse works.

They shared a rock background with the bulk of their peers, and they earliest work draws hard on the sound of Manchester's Factory Records: The sparse, dark feel of Joy Division, the slow, spacious rock of Crispy Ambulance, and the recordings of the Durutti Column's Vini Reilly, who backed his dreamy guitar compositions with all manner of samples and tape loops. In the beginning, Disco Inferno didn't sound like they planned or expected to move much beyond those tones. But something, right around the turn of the 90s, gave them the jolt they needed-- some inspirational combination of the Young Gods, Public Enemy, and techno.

The link between all three: Sampling. If there's anything the post-rock set learned from other genres, it was how to manipulate the arrangement of texture and space in a piece of music-- a studio-music trick most rock bands had entirely forgotten about. D.I.'s Ian Crause picked this up mostly by way of Public Enemy and the Bomb Squad, whose productions offered a strikingly new method for making music move: Instead of changing chords or keys, their tracks shifted through different combinations of sampled sound, each block occupying a different position in the music's landscape. Crause realized he had the technology to apply those concepts to the way a guitar band operated. MIDI sampling meant the group could use their instruments to "play" whatever sounds they wanted, in a room, in real time.

What's most amazing about Disco Inferno, though, isn't just technical innovation-- it's the fact that they learned so quickly how to make actual new music out of those tricks. Through 1993 and '94, they released a series of four EPs, gradually developing a sound as shockingly new as anything else from the period. Something about the EP format seemed to suit the process: It was like an announcement that what they were attempting was hard and rare, slow and studious going. By the time they released an LP, D.I. Go Pop, they'd managed to develop a songcraft that was intimately linked with their methods. The songs on D.I. Go Pop start with Crause's new approach to sampling: Its cycling, alien backdrops are built from the sounds of water, bits of jazz records, children's voices. Around that, the band organizes just enough elements of traditional rock to create the outlines of song-- sudden, solid bass lines emerge from nowhere, fluid guitar parts sneak through the noise, acoustic guitars sketch faraway chord patterns. It all teeters between the concrete and the abstract, right down to Crause's half-spoken chants. If the results bear resemblance to anything at all, it's the spaciest tracks on My Bloody Valentine's Isn't Anything-- both otherworldly and thoroughly concrete, both tripped-out pretty and rooted in reality, both dreamlike and secretly grim, a handful of moving parts implying something much larger and more surprising.

A more conventional document of English post-rock comes from Bark Psychosis, a teenage hardcore band that mellowed out into the sort of avant-garde the whole family can enjoy. In 1990, they brought on keyboard player Daniel Gish, one of the founders of Disco Inferno; by the next year, they were dabbling in technology. By 1992, their sound had gotten so spacious that they were recording improvisations in actual cathedrals, and by the end of the decade they were collaborating with a former member of the art-pop band Talk Talk, one of frontman Graham Sutton's favorites.

If the sound of their best album, 1993's Hex, feels instantly familiar, you can take that as a testament to both the broadness of their influence and the prescient good taste of their influences. The record is warm, comfortable, and surprisingly easy to access. Songs stretch out to eight-minute lengths, casually conjuring up space and weaving together rich, human sounds: Splashes of live drums, fluid dub bass, barbiturate vocals, wisps of guitar and piano and strings. The feel is both pastoral and impressively concrete-- a little like dub reggae might have sounded if it had developed in the English countryside. Those same building, chiming tones echo in bands on either side of the Atlantic, with UK groups like Hood and Movietone, and U.S. groups like South, Zelienople, and the American Analog Set.

What keeps Hex up at the top of the pile, though, is that surprising lack of delicacy, glitter, or gloss. Those things would imply that they were doing this all on purpose, headed here from the beginning. Hex, like Disco Inferno's work, sounds better than that; it sounds fresh, unpremeditated, just-discovered. It's here that another one of post-rock's major influences comes through, in the work of German acts like Faust, Neu!, and Can-- bands that offered a model for how to trip out in real time, gathered together in real space and coaxing out new patterns of sound. For both Bark Psychosis and Disco Inferno, there are shades of "rock music" in that Carducci-style band-in-a-room sense-- only the band's playing something more abstract, cerebral, otherworldly, and fluid than rock usually manages to be.
***

The avant side of the 90s, though, wasn't all about softness and dream. One of the biggest differences between British post-rock and its American counterpart, in fact, was the former's freedom to trade in hard grind-- an impulse best located in the London duo Main. This group's background lay as much in industrial and experimental sound as it did in rock and pop, and their earliest releases had a dark, scrappy feel that's anything but serene.

One of the biggest inspirations for the first wave of post-rockers was techno music, which was just then perfecting the massively popular British strain that would fuel its progress over the next decade. Along with that came the development of "ambient techno," the more abstract, less danceable genre associated with the earliest releases on Warp Records. Main's industrialist grind turned out to be a perfect match for ambience, and around 1992 they merged the two into one, letting metallic guitar textures spread out over sparse, percussive beats. Two years later, and they saw the big payoff: A massive set of tracks called Motion Pool, where drums disappear almost entirely, leaving only deep, dark patterns of noise and drone and mumble. This is post-rock in one of its most "difficult" and obviously experimental modes, more Neubauten than My Bloody Valentine-- but turn the volume up high enough, and it's easy to hear and feel the draw to it. Like plenty of modern-day techno and modern-day drone, all the action is in its texture and its size: Grim, bottomless, even disorienting. Two years after that, the group collected a series of EPs as Hz, leaping even further out into the void.

Closer to the line between comfort and fright was Insides, a half-electronic duo that started its career on the influential art-pop label 4AD. The space and simplicity of their music fell somewhere on a line between synth-pop and trip-hop, with a few chilly guitar tones circling through the mix-- smooth, lulling stuff. The full effect of their songs, on the other hand, is a little too haunting to ever leave you comfortable; singer Kirsty Yates may sing with coy Euro cool, but her lyrics push at the bad side of human relations like its just another sore tooth.

By and large, though, English post-rock offered up some of the decade's sweetest, dreamiest sound, following straight up on another one of its biggest influences-- the late-80s art-pop of the Cocteau Twins, A.R. Kane, Talk Talk, and 4AD. Seefeel, for instance, followed another combination of guitar background and techno impulse, bringing all that floaty art-pop and shoegazer delicacy into the world of beats-- and casting themselves as central figures in the first wave of indie kids to go electronic. From today's viewpoint, their method of combining the two things seems blindingly obvious: Wisps of shoegazer guitar and vocal, drifting and floating over the slow roll of breakbeats, something not entirely unlike Andy Weatherall's groundbreaking dance remix of My Bloody Valentine's "Soon". This was the original indie band that didn't want to be an indie band-- if anything, they wanted to be Aphex Twin, and just happened to bring their indie sensibilities with them.

Seefeel's career was all about straddling those two worlds, making bridges between them. They started releasing records on the rock label Too Pure, but wound up moving over to electronic labels like Warp and Aphex Twin's own Rephlex imprint. If, along the way, they developed a reputation as the techno act it was okay for rock kids to listen to, they also managed to inspire just as many people exploring the outskirts of techno itself: When then quirky German act Mouse on Mars sent their first set of demos to Too Pure, they enclosed a note thanking the label for releasing Seefeel's early work. As time passed, and Seefeel merged more completely with the techno world, it began to seem more and more like their original form of indie-electronica was a pretty useful addition to the musical landscape. Quique, their defining LP, is just one landmark in a subgenre that's spread pretty wide-- straight to current-day labels like Darla and Morr Music, whose acts offer updated combinations of indie aesthetics and computer-music trends.

Morr Music, in fact, makes one of the clearest connections from the early 90s to today. In 2002, they released Blue Skied an' Clear a compilation of electronic acts covering songs by the shoegazer band Slowdive. If you need any more obvious connection between the two things, it's easily found in Slowdive's last album, Pygmalion-- on which frontman Neil Halstead pushed the rest of the band to the sidelines and set out to make something every bit as abstracted as the post-rock set. The result, at its best, is one of the lightest, blissiest dreams of the era: "Blue Skied an' Clear," its standout track, is equal parts Cocteau Twins and Disco Inferno, a studio daydream firmly rooted in pop. The 90s, much more than this decade, produced hour upon hour of ethereal falling-asleep music-- and post-rock acts of every stripe offered some of the best of it.
***

If there was any such thing as a home for post-rock, it was the Too Pure label, whose roster of releases includes loads of lost-generation bands (Stereolab, Laika, Pram, Moonshake, Seefeel), closely-allied artists (Mouse on Mars, Long Fin Killie, Th' Faith Healers), current-day followers (Electrelane), and the odd good-taste extra (PJ Harvey's first recordings). Most of the bands on the label kept at least one foot in more conventional forms of rock and pop, but the animating spirit behind it was all post-rock. Compilations of these bands' work-- like Too Pure's Pop (Do We Not Like That?) and World Domination's Slow Death in the Metronome Factory-- were likely many Americans' first introduction to the English scene.

Stereolab aside, the most fascinating of Too Pure's lost-generation acts was Laika, a project that roped members of the label's other acts into one studio entity. Their first full-length was 1995's Silver Apples of the Moon, an album whose title alone seems to say a lot about the post-rock project. There's the obvious nod to Morton Subotnick's early electronic-music landmark of the same name, but there's also something subtler. From Moonshake to countless Stereolab songs to here, these early post-rock bands were constantly talking about the moon, with all of its usual connotations: Weightlessness, futurism, blank space, and serenity; dreamy, cerebral moods; and of course the beeps and hums of the old technology that first got people there.

Laika named themselves after the dog the Soviets launched into outer space (and never recovered); they named their second album Sounds of the Satellites; if there was anything to justify comparing them with Stereolab, it was that retro-futuristic Sputnik fetish. Their actual sounds, though, sit pretty far apart. Silver Apples layers head-nodding breakbeats into a druggy haze that has a lot in common with Tricky's early trip-hop. On a track like "Marimba Song," which folds in a swirl of jazzy sounds, it's not so far from Maxinquaye; elsewhere they drop out into stiff beats, dub bass, and steely-eyed cooing, leaving them sounding a bit like the electronic duo Lamb.

If anyone on the label sounded much like Stereolab, it was Pram, who shared the same fetish for electronic contraptions and pop formatting. Pram's records, like plenty of Stereolab releases, feel like they're trying to imagine some imaginary new form of traditional pop-- only Pram throw in just about every new sound they can find, from a full exhibit of organs to a mass of toy instruments. The results are anything but cute; most of the time, it's eerie, darkside psychedelia, carnivalesque and almost threatening. Stereolab shot for the moon; Pram found the closest thing on Earth, naming one album North Pole Radio Station.

Other Too Pure acts brought post-rock swinging right back into the rock world that had birthed it. The closest to the lost-generation center was Moonshake, whose first moon references came from a Can song. Their first full-length, Eva Luna (moon alert!) worked a bit like Laika, the band to which two of their members would depart-- only the rush of breakbeats here supports tense guitar scrawl and open-ended rock atmosphere. The Scottish band Long Fin Killie fell even closer to the spike and buzz of rock, with a soaring, romantic blend of sweeping sound, Krautrock influence, and post-punk edge-- something from the same realm that gave us Prolapse and the Delgados. And Th' Faith Healers, one of the earliest bands on the label, sounded midway between an American indie band (Pavement, Dinosaur Jr.) and a shoegazer act, a combination that left them plenty of room to move; "Don't Jones Me", their best-remembered single, sounds a bit like PJ Harvey in psych mode.

Th' Faith Healers' first drummer, in fact, is something like post-rock personified-- or maybe the entire English indie 90s. Joe Dilworth took the photo of My Bloody Valentine that appears on the cover of Isn't Anything; he played drums in the earliest incarnation of Stereolab; he even gets namechecked in Saint Etienne's "Mario's Cafe". It's not hard to find connections like those running all through the decade, and all through these bands-- a whole cadre of people trading ideas, trading skills, and gradually pushing indie rock well beyond the narrow scope of the guitar band. These days-- now that every third indie record manages to squeeze in some ProTools and a glockenspiel solo-- that sounds like an obvious proposition: What's so strange about rock bands trying new sounds? And yet somehow, at the beginning of the 90s, things weren't quite like that; even a rock band with a violin or piano player might get accused of gimmickry. If things have changed, these are some of the people we have to thank.
***

As of the early 1990s, the biggest English influence on American indie bands was the viral effect of shoegazing, which infected plenty of minor US acts. Only a few among them leaped beyond that into post-rock territory. Boston's Swirlies, in between their swooning, helium guitar moves, occasionally pushed their technology into new space. Closer still was the D.C. band Lorelei, now almost completely forgotten. Their 1994 LP, Everyone Must Touch the Stove draws plenty of its moves straight from the American-shoegazer playbook, but other selections practically look into the future: You'd think the tricky time signatures and deep, fleet bass on some of these tracks came around much longer after Tortoise got popular, and it's the slightest bit sad that the liner of an album this good would modestly thank "our three fans." At the same time, plenty of other bands slowed down into something just as studious and weightless as the second English wave, including the Virginian drones of Labradford and South, and the delicate dream-pop of Atlanta's Seely.
Spring Heel Jack, the Orb, Stereolab, and Bergheim 34.
But the real American post-rock came from elsewhere. When I moved to Chicago, in 1995, the city's music scene was just winding down on a long alterna-rock lovefest: Flick on the rock station Q101, or stop by the Cabaret Metro, and you'd hear fizzy, radio-friendly locals like Veruca Salt, Urge Overkill, and Material Issue. Across town, though, something else was moving toward the limelight. Months later, I finally got around to buying a Tortoise record called Millions Now Living Will Never Die, having heard that it'd trump any of the "experiments" I'd been getting from Stereolab or FSOL. It did: This was an astonishing set of underwater Krautrock groove, a submarine pulse that left you wondering why in the world rock bands always played "rock." It certainly didn't bother anyone that some bits just sounded like Neu!; it wasn't like Veruca Salt were about to try that, was it? The first time I listened to it, I fell asleep-- something that, as of the mid-90s, could work as a compliment.

I wasn't the only one to turn on to the Millions vibe. Not too long after that, the whole tenor of the Chicago scene seemed to have changed: Suddenly the local record stores had long, well-stocked bins labeled "Tortoise et al" or "Post-Rock," with the discs inside carefully stickered-- "produced by John McEntire of Tortoise," or "featuring Jim O'Rourke." Those Urge Overkill records went down in the discount bin; up top, you were more likely to find Gastr Del Sol and the Sea and Cake, or Mouse on Mars and Spring Heel Jack. By the time Stereolab released 1997's Dots and Loops-- an album that had them collaborating with McEntire and Mouse on Mars-- the whole thing had gathered up, gone pop, and shouldered its way pretty close to the center of the indie universe.

If American post-rock was more successful than its English counterpart, part of the issue was timing. Most of it, though, was a vast difference in sound and influence, something along the lines of independent invention. Chicagoan Jim O'Rourke's career in experimental music had had brought him into contact with plenty of those UK bands-- he'd even done a remix for Main-- but he and his peers didn't seem to be cribbing much of anything from London.

For the American set, one major starting point was the Louisville, Kentucky band Slint, whose much-loved 1991 album Spiderland, served as a heavy American-rock analog to Hex-- the rock album that ditched speed and pop patterns and crawled studiously into the dark, exploring every possible variation of guitar texture and soft-loud, stop-start dynamics. On the other end, America's post-rockers drew on genres stretching much farther back into history. Plenty of the Chicago mainstays had backgrounds in the Louisville rock scene-- but plenty of their associates had more formal training, in jazz or experimental music. Just as many were rooted in sounds like bossa nova, folk music, and seventies singer/songwriters; albums like Gastr del Sol's Camoufleur (1998) and the Sea and Cake's The Fawn (1997) sounded less post-rock and more post-pop, acoustic tunes abstracted and arranged in a dubby glitter of electronics, strings, horns, and percussion. The Tortoise record collection stretched into film scores like Ennio Morricone's and instrumental "exotica" albums like Martin Denny's, and the band brought out the vibraphones and marimbas to prove it. The English kids sounded like rockers trying hard, working without a net, pushing from shoegazing and art-rock into chilly, moony sound. The Americans were less moon and more rainforest: Their records have a rich, immaculate sound and sheen, one that's constantly reminding you just how much they know exactly what they're doing.

By the end of the decade, though, most of the indie world had long turned its back on this stuff: For plenty of people it seemed boring, noodly, and pretentious. When the staffs of the Wicker Park cafes starting putting the White Stripes' De Stijl on constant rotation, it was hard to tell how much people loved it and how much it just seemed like a breath of fresh, raw, vocoder-free air. In 2003, I had to leave town, and as I packed up my boxes, I heard the same thing I always did: The band that practiced in the basement next door, consisting of drums, bass, and second-hand vibraphone. A day later, and I was unpacking the same boxes in New York City, spiritual home of the current ethos: Straight-up action, post-Strokes, post-Fischerspooner, post-DFA, where indie kids no longer bulk up their mix-tape credibility with some Autechre or Squarepusher on side two, and the new daydream alternative to rock attitude comes mostly from German electronics. I'm awake now, yeah. But I'll be just as curious to see what happens next time the rock world drops out and tries to hit the moon.
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MessagePosté le: 02/07/2008 14:23:43    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Ouais, 6 pages d'anglais jargonneux à se taper...

Bon si c'est aussi bien que l'article de Wire, moi j'imprime parce que lire ça sur écran Pfooou.
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MessagePosté le: 02/07/2008 16:31:25    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

c'est très bien, c'est pour ça que je l'ai mis là. C'est drôle en plus, par moment.
C'est pas jargonneux: j'ai tout compris.
Quand à lire sur l'écran ... ben moi j'ai imprimé l'autre article dont tu parles mais parce que je ne surligne pas bien sur l'ordi.
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MessagePosté le: 03/07/2008 17:08:43    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

guru a écrit:
C'est pas jargonneux: j'ai tout compris.


Après lecture, c'est en effet très bien et tout à fait compréhensible.
Je commence à y voir un peu plus clair dans tout ça donc merci pour les articles.

Le premier était quand même très stylé "chroniqueur hype rock sur le web" !!
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MessagePosté le: 04/07/2008 04:17:41    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

le premier il est mis sur le web mais c'est à la base un article paru en 1994 dans un magazine que je recommande chaudement si vous avez du temps pour lire : Wire.
On le trouve à Rennes musique ...


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MessagePosté le: 06/07/2008 04:40:07    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

C'est dans la boîte, merci messieurs-dames.
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MessagePosté le: 06/07/2008 05:58:04    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

C'est dans la boîte et c'était fort agréable à faire.
Nous avons été d'une efficacité foudroyante. Very Happy

On se donne l'été pour préparer la troize (constellation/Mogwai) avec E-girl.

Dis Mlle electro tu pars sur
?
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MessagePosté le: 06/07/2008 06:44:41    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Elle va pas au Québec ?
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MessagePosté le: 06/07/2008 12:56:58    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Ben tout est compatible !!! Je prépare Mogwaï, je lis les articles ci dessus et surtout j'écoute les deux premières moutures post rock dès que the Hostess les aura mis en ligne pour aout, tout en me délectant de l'accent Québecquois !! A nous les discours de C.R.A.Z.Y. et de Catherine !!!!!!!!!
et en plus je serai dans l'esprit constellations non ? (c'est ben canadien ?)
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MessagePosté le: 06/07/2008 12:58:29    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Mr B a écrit:

Nous avons été d'une efficacité foudroyante. Very Happy

Ca c'est grâce aux COOKIES de la femme du GURU !!! Wink
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MessagePosté le: 09/07/2008 09:08:10    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

je viens de poster l emission post rock 1 Smile helas le niveau du son est faible, j arrive pas a faire mieux pour l instant je comprend pas. j ai preferé posté quand meme. si c est trop faible dites moi. je reboutiquerais ça à mon retour fin juillet.
bises et bonne écoute ! ecoutez au casque, ce sera mieux.

http://theclubhostess.podomatic.com/entry/eg/2008-07-09T03_57_27-07_00
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MessagePosté le: 09/07/2008 16:56:13    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

j'écouterai ça avec plaisir demain, pour l'instant je dois aller m'allonger : j'ai voulu refaire du sport, je ne peux plus marcher.
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MessagePosté le: 09/07/2008 17:22:18    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

guru a écrit:
j'écouterai ça avec plaisir demain, pour l'instant je dois aller m'allonger : j'ai voulu refaire du sport, je ne peux plus marcher.

Mr. Green je compatis...
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MessagePosté le: 10/07/2008 06:17:46    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

cheville dans le sac
j'espère pouvoir reposer le pied pour prendre le train
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MessagePosté le: 10/07/2008 07:38:38    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

écouté
bizarre c'est The Hostess qu'on entend le mieux...

bon sérieusement, ça va, j'ai mis les enceintes un peu plus fort et ça le fait.

Pas mal d'hésitations dans cette émission mais on va dire que ça donne un côté frais.

Sinon j'ai mis en commentaires : c'est Bark Psychosis, pas le prénom du gamin...

Z'en pensez quoi les auditeurs, les collaborateurs ?
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MessagePosté le: 21/08/2008 05:47:46    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Mr B a écrit:


On se donne l'été pour préparer la troize (constellation/Mogwai) avec E-girl.



Mr. Green
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MessagePosté le: 21/08/2008 06:16:11    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

C'est facile de se moquer.
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MessagePosté le: 25/08/2008 19:33:37    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Post rock 2 en ligne :
Emission consacree au POST ROCK, deuxieme partie, enregistree en Juillet 2008. Presentee par Guru, Mr B et The Hostess. Au programme TALK TALK et SLINT.
http://theclubhostess.podOmatic.com/entry/2008-08-25T14_30_00-07_00
La suite! La suite!

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MessagePosté le: 21/09/2008 17:15:28    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Post rock 1, je l'ai écoutée dans un bus Greyhound entre new york et Boston et autant le dire ça l'a fait carrément !!
Je me cherche du Bark Psychosis maintenant !!

Post rock 2 était tout aussi passionnante, même si écoutée en France... ça s'écoute tout seul !!

un grand merci à tous les 3 !!
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MessagePosté le: 12/09/2009 08:15:41    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

guru a écrit:
Mr B a écrit:


On se donne l'été pour préparer la troize (constellation/Mogwai) avec E-girl.



Mr. Green


et maintenant ?
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MessagePosté le: 13/09/2009 16:22:26    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Maintenant, c'est la rentrée et c'est un peu chaud les marrons.
ça me parait donc difficilement possible avant octobre, ou la Toussaint.

Mesdames ?
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MessagePosté le: 13/09/2009 19:20:20    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

vous nous dîtes ce qui vous arrange, on essaiera de se caler Very Happy
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MessagePosté le: 04/01/2010 19:51:48    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Et voilà, l'émission Post Rock 3 est en ligne ici ! on est lent mais on finit par y arriver Wink

Au programme MOGWAI et CONSTELLATION (Godspeed You! Black Emperor ; A Silver Mt. Zion), un groupe et un label ayant un problème avec cette etiquette et pourtant emblematiques.

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MessagePosté le: 05/01/2010 19:01:50    Sujet du message: podcast post rock Répondre en citant

Merci The Hostess tu es parfaite !!! Razz
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MessagePosté le: 22/11/2017 03:30:34    Sujet du message: podcast post rock

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